boobiesmcfeels:

Shakespeare and Kenneth Branagh being amazing

Like actually though - what is this shit? This is like watching olympic ice skating but with words. It is the literary version of dancing on ice with knives strapped to your feet. 

reblogged 17 hours ago @ 18 Sep 2014 with 432 notes via/source

Girls are trained to say, ‘I wrote this, but it’s probably really stupid.’ Well, no, you wouldn’t write a novel if you thought it was really stupid. Men are much more comfortable going, ‘I wrote this book because I have a unique perspective that the world needs to hear.’ Girls are taught from the age of seven that if you get a compliment, you don’t go, ‘Thank you’, you go, ‘No, you’re insane.’

»

Lena Dunham (x)

(via taylorswift)

 
reblogged 17 hours ago @ 18 Sep 2014 with 41,037 notes via/source
posted 23 hours ago @ 18 Sep 2014
xlove this xuntranslateable words

Title: 'Mansfield Park'

Author: Jane Austen

Rating: 3/5

Plot summary: Fanny Price is adopted by her wealthy uncle and aunt in an effort to alleviate the struggles of her mother. She matures into a quiet, observant and dutiful young woman who is adored by her aunt Bertram and her cousin Edmund. Then, the Crawford siblings arrive, changing the dynamic of Mansfield Park significantly. 

What I enjoyed: As with all novels of this genre and time, I enjoyed the grandeur of the houses described, the formal language, the nature of ‘courting’, and the manner in which families are presented in the text. More specifically, the relationship between Edmund and Fanny, and Fanny and her brother William, were exceptionally well-observed and developed by Austen. 

What I struggled with: The short answer is that I did not enjoy reading this book. The plot - to me - appeared far too drawn out. The text felt unnecessarily long (probably a feature of the time) and thus lost its intensity, and my interest. The ending of the text was satisfying, but the preceding chapters left a lot to be desired, in my opinion. 

posted 1 day ago @ 17 Sep 2014 with 1 note
xmansfield park xjane austen xreview xbook review xuniversity xDurham University xwriting-pictures xnovel xprose
reblogged 3 days ago @ 15 Sep 2014 with 54,690 notes via/source

thelifeguardlibrarian:

vintageanchorbooks:

HOW LONG IT TAKES TO READ THE WORLD’S MOST POPULAR BOOKS: http://shortlist.com/entertainment/books/how-long-it-takes-to-read-the-worlds-most-popular-books

My brain likes this like this.

reblogged 3 days ago @ 15 Sep 2014 with 24,098 notes via/source

But Shakespeare one gets acquainted with without knowing how. […] His thoughts and beauties are so spread abroad that one touches them every where, one is intimate with him by instinct. - No man of any brain can open at a good part of one of his plays, without falling into the flow of his meaning immediately.

» Mansfield Park by Jane Austen, Chapter 34.   
posted 3 days ago @ 15 Sep 2014 with 1 note
xjane austen xshakespeare xmansfield park xenglish literature xbooks

jsarloutte:

On my own, Autoportrait, embroidery, 2014.

reblogged 4 days ago @ 14 Sep 2014 with 79,455 notes via/source
reblogged 6 days ago @ 12 Sep 2014 with 112,428 notes via/source
reblogged 1 week ago @ 11 Sep 2014 with 1,144 notes via/source
guardian:


Coupland’s images of jumpers and of the ultimate boogeyman, Bin Laden, remind us of how deep inside us those images are lodged, how they can never be removed, and how, as time passes, their meanings remain as potent as ever, even though we can’t fully decode them. By evoking memories that can’t be deleted by wilful ignorance or overabstraction, Coupland reminds us that we all share a set of uncloseable doors in our minds, and through these opened doors, in an almost cartoon-like way, now march the NSA, Google, spooks, shadow governments.

Michael Stipe on Douglas Coupland’s 9/11-inspired artwork »

guardian:

Coupland’s images of jumpers and of the ultimate boogeyman, Bin Laden, remind us of how deep inside us those images are lodged, how they can never be removed, and how, as time passes, their meanings remain as potent as ever, even though we can’t fully decode them. By evoking memories that can’t be deleted by wilful ignorance or overabstraction, Coupland reminds us that we all share a set of uncloseable doors in our minds, and through these opened doors, in an almost cartoon-like way, now march the NSA, Google, spooks, shadow governments.

Michael Stipe on Douglas Coupland’s 9/11-inspired artwork »

reblogged 1 week ago @ 11 Sep 2014 with 102 notes via/source
humansofnewyork:

"What’s your biggest dream for your child?""We’ll let him dream for himself."

(New Delhi, India)

humansofnewyork:

"What’s your biggest dream for your child?"
"We’ll let him dream for himself."

(New Delhi, India)

reblogged 1 week ago @ 11 Sep 2014 with 18,297 notes via/source

newyorker:

While working as an electrician at Windows on the World, in 2001, Konstantin Petrov documented the banalities of the World Trade Center. Nick Paumgarten writes:

“Inadvertently or not, he left behind a ghostly record, apparently the only one, of this strange twentieth-century aerie, as though he’d been sent here for this purpose alone.”

All photographs by Konstantin Petrov

reblogged 1 week ago @ 11 Sep 2014 with 846 notes via/source
reblogged 1 week ago @ 11 Sep 2014 with 6,080 notes via/source

sixpenceee:

Pictures of Sunsets through Shattered Mirrors by Bing Wright 

reblogged 1 week ago @ 11 Sep 2014 with 96,415 notes via/source